7th September 2013

Photo with 14 notes

FUN GAME!
So, I work in education, and while I’m in my first certified position right now, I’ve been involved in a wide range of school districts over the past decade, since graduating from a public high school (in 2004 in a DRG H), and it’s been fascinating to see the extreme differences between schools and districts that are geographically very close to one another. Connecticut is interesting in public education because we have the widest achievement gap in the United States, measured by standardized test scores and high school graduation rates. Connecticut doesn’t make the list of Top 5 and Bottom 5 states in education, but if you took the top 80% of districts in CT, we’d be in first place, and if you took the bottom 80% of districts in CT, we’d be in last place.
CT’s school districts are divided up into 9 District Reference Groups (DRGs) lettered A through I. The groups are determined by things like access to resources, median income, amount spent on education per pupil, graduation rates, test scores, et cetera. DRG A is essentially made up of communities with more millionaire than non-millionaire families, and DRG I is made up of families with whose students are close to 100% below the poverty line. One of the reasons Connecticut has such a high achievement gap is because our schools are funded almost entirely from local municipal taxes, rather than by County or Connecticut Associaition of Boards of Education (CABE) Area.
The game:
See if you can find a DRG I or DRG H that is IMMEDIATELY next to or surrounded by DRGs A and/or B.

FUN GAME!

So, I work in education, and while I’m in my first certified position right now, I’ve been involved in a wide range of school districts over the past decade, since graduating from a public high school (in 2004 in a DRG H), and it’s been fascinating to see the extreme differences between schools and districts that are geographically very close to one another. Connecticut is interesting in public education because we have the widest achievement gap in the United States, measured by standardized test scores and high school graduation rates. Connecticut doesn’t make the list of Top 5 and Bottom 5 states in education, but if you took the top 80% of districts in CT, we’d be in first place, and if you took the bottom 80% of districts in CT, we’d be in last place.

CT’s school districts are divided up into 9 District Reference Groups (DRGs) lettered A through I. The groups are determined by things like access to resources, median income, amount spent on education per pupil, graduation rates, test scores, et cetera. DRG A is essentially made up of communities with more millionaire than non-millionaire families, and DRG I is made up of families with whose students are close to 100% below the poverty line. One of the reasons Connecticut has such a high achievement gap is because our schools are funded almost entirely from local municipal taxes, rather than by County or Connecticut Associaition of Boards of Education (CABE) Area.

The game:

See if you can find a DRG I or DRG H that is IMMEDIATELY next to or surrounded by DRGs A and/or B.

Tagged: educationedreformeducation policyconnecticutachievement gapsocialismfundingobscene wealthabject povertygeographycartographymaps

  1. theravenousboy reblogged this from qarl-marxx and added:
    yikes
  2. thecrimsontrinh reblogged this from qarl-marxx
  3. elune-be-praised reblogged this from qarl-marxx and added:
    Interesting
  4. jhrmn reblogged this from qarl-marxx and added:
    This is cool! My hometown is a DRG G in between a DRG I and a bunch of DRG Ds! Connecticut is all kinds of places! Some...
  5. ralphspoilsportmotors reblogged this from textswillvalentigets and added:
    Norwalk is a pretty obvious example. We’re called “the doughnut hole” for pretty obvious reasons. Although I motion that...
  6. qarl-marxx reblogged this from textswillvalentigets
  7. textswillvalentigets reblogged this from qarl-marxx and added:
    It looks like someone hijacked this post, and kind of missed the point…
  8. rehreh88 reblogged this from cthublove and added:
    Wow, really interesting to look at. Never would have thought of Norwalk as being an H, while Torrington is a G! Very...
  9. cthublove reblogged this from qarl-marxx and added:
    I’d never actually seen this map before- interesting to see the map after going through New Canaan’s public...
  10. stockholdersfirst reblogged this from qarl-marxx